Blog – Crime & safety statistics

Crime & safety statistics – Blog

The coming crime catastrophe: The 2019/20 crime stats and post-COVID19 violence prevention in South Africa

04 Aug 2020 | by Guy Lamb | Safety and Violence Initiative

Various research reports have shown the devastating effect that the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown regulations have had on large segments of the South African population, in which there have been alarming increases in poverty, unemployment, food insecurity, hunger and domestic violence. These dynamics are likely to transform the current crime crisis into a crime catastrophe in the medium term

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Ramaphosa's plans aren't enough to adequately tackle violent crime in South Africa

21 Feb 2019 | by Guy Lamb | Safety and Violence Initiative

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa used his State of the Nation Address on February 7 to outline his relatively new government’s actions and plans. However, the crime prevention strategies he outlined were somewhat stale. Most, especially those related to policing and gender-based violence, have been tried before. They yielded few positive results and there is no evidence to suggest that they’ll work any better now.

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South Africa is at war with itself

South African society is becoming more, not less, violent. This was confirmed by the 2017/18 crime statistics released by the South African Police Service (SAPS) yesterday. Violence affects all South Africans, with the greatest impact on people who are black and poor. Young black men have the highest chance of being murdered. But violence against children and women is at the root of this problem. The effects on individuals are long term – children who grow up in violent households are more likely to use or become victims of violence later in life.

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Killing of women and children sees massive increase in SAPS crime statistics

11 Sep 2018 | by Institute for Security Studies

Police, on Tuesday 11 September, reported the killing of women increased 11% in the year to end March 2018, with 20% more boys (under 18 years) murdered compared to the previous 12 months.

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Do foreigners really commit SA’s most violent crimes?

Statements by Gauteng’s police head promote xenophobia and could provoke violence against foreigners.

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What do we know about murder in South Africa?

For a country with one of the highest global murder rates, little is publicly known about the murder trends.

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Crime stats – the devil is in the detail

01 Nov 2017 | by Guy Lamb, Safety and Violence Initiative, University of Cape Town (UCT SaVI)

The aggregate manner in which the crime data and statistics are presented masks the disproportionate nature of violent crime in South Africa, which for decades has been concentrated in about 20 per cent of police precincts. Most of these high crime precincts are densely populated, infrastructurally marginalised and characterised by elevated levels of poverty. Therefore, in seeking to gauge a more informed analysis of crime a focus on high crime precincts provides a more enlightening touchstone for the state of violent crime in South Africa.

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Police not coping with serious violent crime

24 Oct 2017 | by Institute for Security Studies

A steady rise in murder and armed robbery shows police are not getting a grip on serious violent crime in South Africa, despite a budget increased by almost 50% since 2011/12 to R87 billion.

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What story will South Africa’s latest crime stats tell?

11 Oct 2017 | by Lizette Lancaster and Nthato Ntsoko, Institute for Security Studies

In this blog, Lizette Lancaster and Nthato Ntsoko discuss how the soon to be released 2017 SAPS crime statistics will likely paint a worrying but incomplete picture of the crime situation in South Africa.

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What to look for in South Africa’s troubling crime statistics

Crime is not at all evenly distributed in any country or city, so smaller scale data is essential. Crime statistics are public property. Every citizen has a right to access them easily, promptly and in a format that makes them useful to our lives and decisions. We also have a responsibility to read them critically but honestly.

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